Saturday, February 26, 2011

Are The Robins Confused? Miss Billie Says So


I am not so happy to report that here at Farming On Faith we are covered in a blanket of snow. We have 4 inches of snow on this Saturday morning.

Yesterday ~ I ventured over to Miss Billies in the snow. She was worried about the birds. I am just sure she feeds all the birds in the world. Miss Billie was so worried ~ all the birds were frantic! I began to fill feeder after feeder. I wish I could have captured the sight to share with you.  The birds came in flocks. 

 First came the Cardinals. It was a splash of red~ I mean about 50 of the most beautiful ~graceful birds. It was the most gorgeous sight.

Next came the Robins~ it seemed like hundreds. Robins are ground feeders and do not eat at the bird feeders. Miss Billie is sure that the Robins are confused. "They have arrived way to soon"~ she says. 

I am wishful thinking and hope that these little creatures know that Spring is around the corner.  

I did a little research to put Miss Billie's mind at ease. She is so very worried for the confused Robins ~ they will not get any worms from this frozen ground. She is sure the warm weather  just has them so very confused. If it does not warm up next week she will have me looking for worms~ I am just sure of it!


This is what I found ~ (taken from Bird Education site)

Birds know when to migrate by the length of daylight. Through autumn, daylight hours grow shorter. Then, when winter begins, the days begin to get longer. At mid- to late-winter, birds begin to feel restless. They have an internal clock, and they know that soon it is time to start moving north. Their restlessness (ornithologists call this pre-migratory restlessness zugunruhe) becomes irresistable depending on the length of day...but birds won't start to migrate just any ol' time. They wait for the weather and temperature to be right. Robins follow behind the spring thaw, waiting for the average temperature to reach 2=B0C. And they wait for favorable winds. They want a tail wind-for the south wind to come along and help them move north. So, knowing when to migrate involves an internal clock, a feel for temperature, and the right weather patterns that create south winds.

So what can they eat~  ( taken from learner.org)

A Robin's Favorite Winter FoodsIn winter robins concentrate on berry bushes, trees and vines, like the bittersweet vine above. (On warm days, though, you might spot a robin running on lawns, searching for worms!) Winter robins eat berries, other fruits, and seeds they find on shrubs, trees, and vines. If robins happen to overwinter near you, you can offer them frozen or fresh fruit. They'll go for apple slices, raisins, blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and cherries.
Birdseed? No Thanks!
Did you ever wonder why it's hard to attract robins to a bird feeder? Most robins have simply never eaten at a feeder before, so they lack the experience to know what feeders are for. And even the hungriest robin would never eat birdseed.







I stood just watching bird after bird eat~ all were singing in three part harmony!~ I was so excited to watch the little finches take their turn along with some familiar and some not so. I had such a great morning watching all of these wonderful creatures that the Creator has created.


Lastly came the Starlings ~they are pushy birds for sure. Miss Billie says that they are bullies and they are. They ran off all the other birds in such a rude manner. Miss Billie says that they are bullies. Yet she said, "We can't all be Cardinals." She even gave grace for those mean bullies. 


 I assured Miss Billie that God will take care of the birds just fine ~ and she reminded me that God needed her help.


What a fun lesson I had yesterday watching Miss Billie's birds~   The Bible tells us that God cares when a bird falls from it's nest~ oh how much more He cares for you and me. 


What an awesome God!





Matthew 10:29-31 (KJV)


 29Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father.
 30But the very hairs of your head are all numbered.
 31Fear ye not therefore, ye are of more value than many sparrows.












8 comments:

Amy said...

Gorgeous pictures Carrie! Have a blessed and wonderful weekend! Amy

Sue said...

Oh I loved the bird photos until I got down to the starling. I have seen starlings peck the eyes out of bluebirds and other younger birds. We don't keep them around here....need I say more? LOL

Love the photo of the cardinal. Aren't they so pretty against the white snow?

Can't wait to see my robins again. Won't be long now :D

Blessings!

Aliene said...

Love this story about ms.Billie wanting to help God feed the birds. If it makes her happy, bless her. I love the cardinal, too.
We have birds all over one day and then they are not so abundant. We are getting our bird houses cleaned and in order. I love to watch them build a nest and then feed the babies.

Barbara said...

your birds are so pretty so many different kinds, our feeders stay busy these days too, although we have no snow, hugs my friend, have a very blessed weekend, Barbara

Summer said...

Wonderful bird photos and beautiful scripture!

Gail @ Faithfulness Farm said...

Lol...I've seen a few confused robins here this week too :)

Blessings!
Gail

Tanya said...

How funny about the robins! I was reading your post and then went to kitchen to start dishes and looked out my window and my backyard had a whole flock of them on the ground looking for worms! I watched them for the longest time!
I think we're close to spring Carrie! Although I think you may get a little more snow coming than us. I was watching news and it looked like north of KC was going to get another dose?
I'm holding on for next week....it looks better!
Have a wonderful Lord's Day! Thinking of you!
Hugs and blessings!

Julze said...

So neat to see photos of birds in your country, Carrie!
God bless,
Julia

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